Image Courtesy of RamDass.org

DO WE NEED A DAILY PRACTICE?

WRITTEN BY RAM DASS
Ram Dass first went to India in 1967. He was still Dr. Richard Alpert, a prominent Harvard psychologist and psychedelic pioneer with Dr. Timothy Leary. He continued his psychedelic research until that fateful Eastern trip in 1967, when he traveled to India. In India, he met his guru, Neem Karoli Baba, affectionately known as Maharajji, who gave Ram Dass his name, which means “servant of God.” Everything changed then – his intense dharmic life started, and he became a pivotal influence on a culture that has reverberated with the words “Be Here Now” ever since. Ram Dass’ spirit has been a guiding light for three generations, carrying along millions on the journey, helping to free them from their bonds as he works through his own.
Ram Dass: Do We Need a Daily Practice?

Originally published at RamDass.org and graciously shared with ENDPAIN.

This story is part of our month exploring the theme of Self-Care. Follow along with us all January for more stories on the theme.

Are there benefits in creating a daily practice?

Well, I have two answers, the “up-level” answer is, it doesn’t matter. The other answer, the one most of us want and need to hear is, yes. It’s absolutely wonderful to have a daily practice, because most of us are very deeply in the world and we get lost very easily into the stuff of life. So, to have a daily practice that keeps reminding you and pulling you back and awakening again; giving you a chance to look at what’s happened and how you may have gotten lost the day before, to keep putting what’s happening to you in the world back into perspective is very useful.

Every morning when I wake up, I read a little spiritual passage, I keep them next to my bed. I just pick one up and start the day reading a little quote or something like that, and it starts me remembering what the game is about, it reminds me. Now, that’s a regular spiritual practice, it happens every morning when I get up.

SO I WOULD SAY, SPIRITUAL PRACTICE IS WONDERFUL IF YOU WANT TO DO IT, AND IF YOU DON’T, DON’T.

There are certainly some traditions in which no regular practice is required and people do fine, so I can’t say it’s necessary, but I certainly find it useful and I would certainly encourage other people to do it. It’s rather delicate though because it’s important that you practice from the place of really remembering why you are doing it. Also, that you are doing it with some joy and appreciation.

It’s easy to get caught in, “Oh, I’ve got to do my practice,” which is fine, the practice will probably clean that out in you but it can be similar to what happened to most people who were made to go to church every Sunday, they ended up hating religion. I would rather push people away from spiritual practices until they are so hungry for them that they really want to do the practice. Rather than having them caught in the feelings of, “I ought to do the practice or I’m a bad person.” Where they end up hating the whole business, and in the long run, that’s not good for you. So I would say, spiritual practice is wonderful if you want to do it, and if you don’t, don’t.

THIS REALLY ISN’T “FALLING OFF THE PATH,” IT’S JUST ANOTHER PART OF THE PATH.

That isn’t to say there isn’t value in doing a practice every day, even when you don’t want to do it, especially in a meditation practice, because in meditation practice, the not wanting to do it, is as much grist for the mill of meditation as wanting to do it. It’s all stuff you can work with in the mind and that’s very beautiful. It’s a delicate balance that goes on inside oneself, recognizing that if you build up too much of a negative tone towards your practice, too much resistance, you’re going to have a reaction to it that’s going to take you away from it for a while.

This really isn’t “falling off the path,” it’s just another part of the path. My guidance in regards to practice is to go slow. Try not to get too, “gung-ho,” don’t figure you’re going to get enlightened today. Relax into it and just start to tune in.

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